Holy Hour for Priests on August 4th–St. John Vianney’s Memorial–End of 54-Day Rosary Novena

Yesterday I wrote at Catholic Exchange on how “Eucharistic Adoration Will Save the World.” To that end, I’d like to invite you, dear brother or sister in Christ, to consider asking your priest(s) to offer a Holy Hour for the Sanctification of Priests on the Memorial of St. John Vianney, Patron of Parish Priests, which is August 4th and invite your parish to attend. This is how we will be ending our 54-Day Rosary Novena for Priests, but it is also something that, through Our Lady’s prompting, led me to request this Holy Hour every year starting last year in my parish. If Eucharistic Adoration will save the world, we must come before Our Lord’s Real Presence with, and on behalf, of our spiritual fathers so the priesthood can be renewed, strengthened, sanctified, and to offer reparations for their sins to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. I am in the process of writing materials for this year’s Holy Hour. Feel free to email me at constance.t.hull81@gmail.com if you would like those materials when I am done writing them in the next week.

For our Holy Hour we pray the Rosary and Divine Mercy, which are led by our priests. We have a few minutes of silent adoration and then intercessory prayers for the priesthood. We end the hour with Benediction. We are on the East Coast and our Holy Hour will be from 6-7:10 pm (Benediction begins at 7 pm) in case you want to see about having a Holy Hour at the same time if you are in our time zone. How wonderful it would be to all be praying before Our Eucharistic Lord at the same time! The same would be true of other time zones praying together. Otherwise anytime on that day is perfect for a Holy Hour for our priests. May God renew His priests through His Eucharistic Heart burning with love for them and us.

54-Day Rosary Novena for Our Priests Started Today

Today we kicked off the 54-Day Rosary Novena for Our Priests in our area. There are parishes from at least 10 dioceses in the U.S. also joining us. Please join us! You can start praying at any point in the novena even if you find this post on the last day. Pray for our priests! The spiritual adoption of priests using Fr. Anthony’s beautiful image of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Immaculate Heart of Mary, and St. Joseph’s Chaste Heart can start at any point. Priests are always in need of prayers. Contact me for the PDF of the prayer card that can be formatted and sent to a printer. The novena brochure can be accessed here and you are welcome to print however many you need for your parish. I do have some extra already printed prayer cards. Not enough to equip an entire parish, but if you’d like me to send you some, please contact me and I will mail them out to you. I still have some priests from our diocese to adopt as well if you want to adopt a priest from my diocese on top of your own priest. Also, consider seeing if your priest would be willing to the lead the Rosary for members of your community like we did today and pray the Rosary for that day of the novena. Thank you very much for your prayers for our priests! May Our Lord unleash abundant graces upon our priests through the Immaculate Heart of Mary through this novena. God bless.

Spiritual Adoption of Priests Starts This Weekend

Over 1200 brochures and prayer cards are going out to 5 parishes in my area this weekend—Corpus Christi!!!—that call for prayer for priests through spiritual adoption. The 54-Day Novena begins next Saturday, June 12. Parishes in 8 dioceses are looking at starting this spiritual adoption and novena campaign. All glory to God! This project belongs to Our Mother. Contact me if you would like the PDFs—including Fr. Anthony’s beautiful prayer card—to get this going in your area. Please pray daily for our priests!
Artist: Fr. Anthony Ferguson, Diocese of Richmond, http://www.castingoutfear.org, Twitter @FatherFerg Instagram @frfergart

54-Day Rosary Novena for Our Priests

This year there are exactly 54 days between the Memorial of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Memorial of St. John Vianney. With everything that has been facing the priesthood and the need for renewal, now is the time to pray a 54-Day Rosary Novena for our priests. My area will be doing a spiritual adoption of each priest in our diocese and the novena. If your parish is interested in using the prayer card my parochial vicar created, please contact me at constance.t.hull81@gmail.com. The spiritual adoption of your parish priest or the priests of the diocese can be done at any point during the novena or at a later time. Fr. Anthony has graciously agreed for his artwork to be used freely wherever it is needed with attribution. All you need to do is format the prayer card document and send the prayer card to your local printer or print it in your parish. I also have a tri-fold brochure in PDF that I can email to folks to print as well that you are welcome to use. All of it is free of charge. We just want people to pray for priests! God bless you. I hope you will join us in this novena. Here is the novena information in a web format:

54-Day Rosary Novena for Our Priests

“The priest is not a priest for himself; he does not give himself absolution; he does not administer the Sacraments to himself; He is a priest for you.”

St. John Vianney

NOVENA SCHEDULE
27 Days of Petition
June 12-July 9
27 Days of Thanksgiving
July 10-August 4

The 54-Day Rosary Novena is six novenas prayed in a row for the same prayer intentions. The first half of the novena focuses on three novenas in petition to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus through the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The second half of the novena is an offering of three novenas in thanksgiving for God hearing our prayers. The novena follows a set schedule of praying the Joyful Mysteries, Sorrowful Mysteries, and Glorious Mysteries. The Luminous Mysteries are not prayed for a 54-day novena, so this novena does not follow the usual days of the Rosary. We will begin with the Joyful Mysteries on June 12th, the next day Sorrowful, next day Glorious, then repeat.

Designed by Fr. Anthony Ferguson
www.castingoutfear.org
Follow on Twitter @FatherFerg
Follow on Instagram @frfergart

Fr. Anthony Ferguson, Parochial Vicar, St. Andrew’s Catholic Church in Roanoke, VA in the Diocese of Richmond custom designed this image for the spiritual adoption of our priests and for our novena. The four crosses in each corner are a reference to the altar where Our Lord is offered by the priest in His Eucharistic Sacrifice. The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus is pierced for love of us, pouring out His blood for our salvation into the chalice of the New Covenant. The fire of His love burns and illuminates the entire image and inflames the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Pure Heart of St. Joseph. The Immaculate Heart of Mary points to Her as the Mother and Queen of priests who is pierced in union with Her Son and for her priest-sons. St. Joseph’s Chaste Heart in this Year of St. Joseph represents his spiritual fatherhood in the life of the priest and the priest’s call to defend Holy Mother Church. The Latin on the chalice is taken from Revelation 21:5 “Behold, I make all things new.” The Latin on the bottom is from Psalm 110:4, which is used at ordination Masses: “You are a priest forever.” The sword piercing Our Lady and St. Joseph’s lily are pointing in the same direction as Our Lord’s Most Precious Blood flowing into the chalice. Our salvation is through Him alone.

Novena Intentions

For our bishop, priests, seminarians, and an increase in holy vocations to the priesthood in our diocese.

  • To be completely Eucharistic. Seeking their identity in Him alone.
  • To be men of deep prayer and intimate union with the Most Holy Trinity.
  • To seek the Father for themselves and for others.
  • To be filled with a zeal for the evangelization of souls.To be alone with Mary, close to her heart, with her in prayer, and to live as her beloved sons. 
  • To celebrate the Mass with great love, devotion, and reverence, and to live the Mass in their daily ministry
  • To consecrate every moment of the day to Our Lady through the Liturgy of the Hours. 
  • To enter the conversation of the Rosary daily.
  • To become true spiritual fathers through the intercession of Mary and St. Joseph.
  • To be men who are crucified with Christ for the salvation of souls.
  • To walk the Way of the Cross in their daily lives in union with Christ and Our Sorrowful Mother.
  • To seek the path to holiness no matter the cost.
  • To be bold and clear preachers of God’s Word and authentic doctrine.
  • To be men of close fraternal communion with one another.
  • To build up, defend, and protect families and the Mystical Body of Christ.

Spiritual Communion

*To be said after the completion of the Rosary each day.

My Jesus, I believe that you are present in the Most Holy Sacrament. I love You above all things, and I desire to receive You in my soul. Since I cannot at this moment receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as if You were already there and unite myself wholly to You. Amen.

**You do not have to pray two Rosaries per day to complete this novena, although you may. You can unite all of your other daily Rosary intentions to this novena.

Thank you for praying for our priests! Please pray for them daily.


St. John Vianney, ora pro nobis.

Calling Catholic Men to Reclaim Their Masculinity in an Age of Hostility

We live in an age of hostility towards men within our culture and within the Church. After years of discussions with my husband and my guy friends it’s become clear that men don’t think they’re being engaged by the Church. Too often the Church has embraced the erroneous teachings of radical feminism as opposed to the gift of a true Christian anthropology.

This has led to disengagement on the part of men who are tired of being shoved off to the side or who have been taught to sit down and be quiet. Now is the time for men to engage in the spiritual battle raging around us with St. Joseph as a guide and through the support of women who are not interested in power struggles or hostile forms of feminism. We need priests who call men to lead and who lead themselves. Husbands, fathers, brothers, friends, and priests are needed to lead the spiritual fight we find ourselves in during these dark days.

After many discussions with men around me and as I have tried to behind the scenes to encourage the men in my life–my husband, priests, and brothers in Christ–I decided to tackle this topic in some videos and in my writing. Here’s my latest video on the subject:

Lenten Rosary of Reparations for the Sins of Priests on Instagram

Join my daughter and me for our live Rosary for Priests on Thursday evenings during Lent at 7:30 pm Eastern Time. We will be offering a Rosary of reparation for the sins of priests through the Sorrowful Mysteries. Come discover the tremendous power of acts of reparation as we pray with Our Immaculate and Sorrowful Mother in union with Christ the Eternal High Priest for a truly holy priesthood. You can find me on Instagram @constancethull.

Praying for Priests-Live On Instagram on Thursday Evenings at 7:30 pm Eastern Time

Hi all! Sorry I haven’t posted much recently. I’ve been dealing with some chronic health issues. I’m going to start praying a live Rosary on Thursday evenings on Instagram at 7:30 pm Eastern Time. You can find me on Instagram @constancethull. It’s the only social media platform I use besides saving things on Pinterest.

I picked Thursday because it’s the day Our Lord instituted the Holy Eucharist and Holy Orders. I truly believe the laity must start fighting for holy priests in union with the Immaculate Heart of Mary. They need us to have their backs in the dark days ahead and we need true spiritual fathers who are willing to go into the breach crucified with Christ for the salvation of souls. Please pray for your priests and all priests. Here’s a video explaining what I’m trying to do. I will expand more during the Rosary too. Pax.

Our Worth Is Determined By God

The struggle with my calling from God and my own will came to a head in recent weeks. I’ve found myself increasingly more ill from chronic bile reflux disease, which is causing me very painful gastritis and esophagitis. Over the course of the last few months, what previously would be an occasional painful flare up, has turned into a normal way of life for me. My medications are now largely useless and I have had to turn to extreme measures by severely limiting my diet in order to help bring about some sort of healing. Meanwhile I have to undergo a few rather unpleasant tests to see if I need surgery on my esophagus.

I was able to function while in pain for quite some time without anyone knowing how miserable I was until recently. I’ve lost 10 lbs in the last week and my husband has asked me to give up driving until I can return to a normal caloric intake. I wish that I could say that I simply raised my eyes to heaven and said: “Your will, not mine.” Instead, I cried a lot and a torrent of pain I had been internalizing came rushing out on our way to daily Mass today. He’s driving me to daily Mass when he can this week.

Then, as has happened before, my priest gave a homily that matched verbatim everything I had been crying in agony about. The Holy Spirit sought to bring comfort and conviction to me through his preaching. I have felt utterly useless. It is a struggle to make dinner and keep my house clean some days. I’ve been in bed more in the last few months than I have in my entire life. There are times I lay staring at the ceiling in pain trying to pray, but I can’t focus and so I pray seemingly mindless prayers through the Liturgy of the Hours, the Rosary, and Stations of the Cross for priests.

I have fallen into the temptation that strikes all of us in times of illness. I watched it with my husband when he was debilitated by his chronic illness that is now quiet for the time being so he can take care of me. I have watched it for years with my chronically ill father. It is the false belief that our worth comes from what we are able to do, when it reality, our worth comes from the fact that we are made in the image and likeness of God. We are loved by Him. Our being is enough.

It is hard to see this truth in a society fully entrenched in the culture of death. We are inundated with messages on a daily basis that our only worth to others is based on what we can do for them or give to them. The unborn, elderly, handicapped, the poor, and the sick are a burden that needs to be hidden away or done away with. Whether we mean to or not, the rampant utilitarianism within our society has crept into our own understanding. I know I have ingested that lie. The belief that it is our use that determines our worth comes to the forefront when we find ourselves not quite so “useful” at different periods in our lives.

Much like my husband did for 2.5 years, I had to finally tell my family, friends, priests, editor, and ministries that I need to take a step back for a little while until I am well enough to function properly. I will do what I can, but it will depend on how I’m feeling on a given day. I can’t be driving around town if I haven’t been able to eat enough calories to keep me from blacking out. My husband rightly pointed out to me that passing out at the ambo during Mass while I’m lectoring would be irresponsible of me. Part of being sick is Our Lord pruning away the parts of our ego that still want to cling to a false sense of power and control.

The reality is, our true worth and our progress in holiness is not solely dependent on what we can accomplish in a physical sense. It is in times of sickness when we are united to Christ Crucified that He often does His most beautiful work and we advance spiritually in ways never previously possible. Even though I may not “feel” like my prayers accomplish much since I lack focus, it doesn’t change that God is at work through them.

My suffering is not meaningless, even though the Enemy is always there in the background telling me otherwise with his lies and accusations. Suffering brings about graces we won’t fully know about until the next life. Illness is a time of growing radically in faith, hope, and charity since it is a time of strengthening the will and a time when consolations may seem in shorter supply.

No, I can’t go where I want to go right now. I can only focus on trying to serve my family as I’m able to and pray and sacrifice for priests. I can only go where He wants me to go, and for right now, a good deal of my time is spent sitting or lying in my bed trying by His grace to raise my eyes to heaven. I will accomplish more in these months of suffering than I have in all of my healthy years. I trust God is at work, even when I can’t see Him.

Your worth is not determined by what you can do. It is determined by God and His great love for you. Don’t let anyone–the world, the Enemy, yourself–tell you otherwise.

Catholic Exchange: Women Deserve Better Than the False Promises of Contraceptive Culture

One of the Great Injustices Against Women

One day history will show that one of the great injustices against women in our time is birth control. There are a plethora of reasons why this is the case. But there is another dimension that is often overlooked. Birth control has led to a woefully inadequate focus in the medical field on women’s health. Ask any woman who deals with debilitating hormone issues that exacerbate other health issues and you will find countless stories of women who were told the Pill was the only answer.

I am one of those women.

I’ve written in the past about my four miscarriages and low hormones that have been a chronic problem for me. Natural Procreative Technologies (NaPro) helped for a while, but eventually I developed severe side effects from my hormone treatments. This led me to have to end the shots that were helping treat my low estrogen and progesterone. The only solution left to me by my doctor was to go on the Pill.

I briefly considered it for medical reasons, which the Church allows, but discovered, after doing research, that I possess a genetic mutation that makes me much more likely to get a life-threatening blood clot if I were to take birth control. I decided to bear with the difficult symptoms and unite them to Christ on the Cross for His greater glory and for those He has specifically asked me to suffer for. That doesn’t mean this path has been easy. The Cross is never easy, but it is the path to love and joy.

As I’ve gotten older, my hormone issues have gotten worse and aggravated other chronic health issues that developed after my gallbladder removal. I am getting sicker as I get older. I currently can’t eat most foods, especially when my hormones drop and inflammation rises precipitously, rendering me ill for a week or two each month.

This is not to complain about my plight. Suffering is redemptive, and a means of sanctification that must be embraced, despite the moments of affliction. This is to point out that the medical community has failed women like me.

Read the rest over at Catholic Exchange.